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is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
superintendent in nevada. richard's passion lies in advancing educational equity and opportunity for all and we are very lucky to have him here with us here in san francisco. our superintendent of schools, richard karunda >> melinda, thank you so much for that wonderful introduction. i want to welcome you all to a sunny september morning in san francisco, i hope you have your sun block and i also want to welcome home our lieutenant governor, our former mayor, gachb newsom. it's good to see you, sir. yesterday was a really powerful experience for us in san francisco. we've made a commitment that by the end of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documentary but also go through a rich can urriculum from our teachers understanding the lessons from that movie. we all know a movie in and of itself doesn't make a difference, but i will tell you, we didn't start our approach to understanding it with the movie bully. we're very proud 234 san francisco that we have had an approach based on restore
graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a
randell, vice president of education programs at common sense media based here in san francisco. we became ka is responsible for partnering with school districts and departments of education across the country to help children and youth learn how to think critically, behave safely and participate responsibly in our digital world which we all have heard brings its own complications. she oversees the department's education staff, working in the 3 largest districts in the country, new york, denver, maine, texas, florida, and the bay area. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome rebecca randell. >> great, thank you, melinda. i'm going to ask you all to come up now. as they get seated i'll say a few words. all these panelists really bring a great wealth of experience and wisdom to what on the one hand is actually a really complicated issue and on the other hand at its very core is somewhat simple. whether it's online or off-line, bullying and harassment or as the teens that we encounter at common sense media often say, drama, it's about power. as you heard the boy on the video say,
thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
, where they need the revenue for education and other good causes. >> i know you don't agree with that, but explain to me why you don't agree. >> sure, a lot of folks call this powerball fever. a better name for it is "the swindle flu." powerball, you name any other lottery program. i mean, this is a government program that is based on pushing citizens into deeper personal debt. it is a classic gimmick, and has become the public voice of american government today. and it is a lie. when people say they don' play this as an investment, according to the consumer federation of america, you have one in five americans who think the most practical way to build wealth is to play the lottery. >> yeah, but terry rich -- >> return to america's working class. we turned america's working class into its lottery class. >> okay, terry rich, what do you say to that? you have no way, do you running a lottery, of knowing who is buying these tickets? their demographic, their wealth, anything. you don't really know if they are very poor people who are spending much more than they can afford on a weekly bas
that will improve their schools and education? once again, the teachers' unions say no. we await word from a judge in a key case on this very issue. >>> but first up, we'll look at the economy, stocks and the federal reserve. a quick note on the economy, a 2.7% gdp revision today. it looks okay on the outside. stronger housing investment, i like that. decent corporate profits, i like that a lot. there was's big business inventory bulge. that will -- consumer spending weaker than many expected growing just 1.4%. finally most importantly and difficult, business investment fell. equipment software fell, building structures fell, we've seen some lousy numbers on the durable goods and manufacture odds, it's a very bad sign that business is not in good shape. not in recession, but kind of this 1.5 to 2% thing that's driving me crazy. >>> let's turn to the fed a front-page "wall street journal" story suggests that maybe more fed stimulus may be coming. the question -- do we need it. here is lee hoskins. lee, welcome back. do we need more federal reserve stimulus? >> well, no, larry, we don't. how many ti
them education made this new economy. so it wasn't that the government was spending. government and intentionally in a sense was restructuring the economy making it prepared for the post war period. as also an interesting book in the period in the 30's the government was actually giving a lot of investment and that increased productivity and that after the war it increased their returns to the investment in the private sector and so it created a context that was done during the war that said we had public spending provided a context with higher returns. this is an important point. in general, we've got this notion that the sector is complementary to the private investment. i mean, there is a lot of things that people will do if they believe there is an adequate transportation network if they believe that they are going to have skilled workers available because they have had good education to be sure. >> i tend to strip down to the minimal story and would be just about the debt and of course what we are doing right now we have states and government cancelling infrastructure proje
read more americans are college educated than they've ever been and if the colleges are doing their job making us better critical thinkers and more nimble we are able to take on the opinions and better able to think the issues through and then we should be living in the ultimate best time for this course and does anybody currently think that we are living in a golden age of political discourse? we should think things to be better and one of the things. the universities are places where students are taught certain topics have to walk on eggshells and what ends up happening in this situation is not that people change their mind about what they believe that they just play it safe. the talk to people they already agree with and if there is one thing the research is clear on if you live in an eco chamber you will be much more certain with the listening to understand where the other side is coming from and so one of the things that is frustrating right now is the tightly packed ourselves in the ego chambers the tighter the echo chamber is high school students have more arguments with people t
not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management person
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
and not being educated about it. i think that's what creates the difficulty in society. so i'll go up to the kid and say, my name is oscar and i've got these cool prosthetic legs, i'll tell them an interesting story like a shark bit them off or if the mother is looking i'll say it's because i didn't eat my vegetables, get brownie points there. ultimately i say i don't have legs but can live a very normal life. hopefully the next time they see somebody in a wheelchair or with a disability, they're not bewildered but they're educated and it's not as different as i think many of the older generation grew up with, something we didn't talk about. >> you were born without the fbi u la bo-- fibula in both legs. around your first birthday you had double amputees. basically your family ignored it, you started playing sports at a very young age. what is that moment when a man with no legs decides, i know what i'm going to do, i'm going to be a sprinter? the reason i ask you is i interviewed the armless archer who was incredible as well. i'm watching him do his stuff in here was like watching you run. of a
, and i want to give our children the kind of education they need. i want to lead the world in research, technology, and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads, bridges, and our schools. i want to do this by bringing down our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. [applause] we have important decisions to make. our ultimate goal is to get our long-term deficits under control in a way that is balanced and fair, and that will be good for businesses, for future generations. i believe both parties can and will work together in the coming weeks to get that done. we know how that gets done. we will have to raise more revenue, cut out spending we do not need, building on the spending cuts we have already made, and if we combine those two things, which can create a path where america is paying its bills while being able to make investments in things we need to do like grow infrastructure. we know how to do it, but in washington nothing is easy, so there is kind to be some prolonged negotiations. all of us will have to get out of our company's films to make tha
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
left undone online and all around discovery. how you create an entertainment and education experience online, and joyus was video was the pair time. >> you run joyus. these are not just photographs of clothes. we go on and we click and look at red blue, white. >> right. >> this is something much more than that. >> it's storytelling. really. you know, if you look at what is happening online. you see on the one hand your video is exploding 42 42 million month. and we may see 30 seconds of video on one topic or another. on the other hand on these products that are experiencetial. at the end of the day i go out and shop. i don't know if your wife is a shopper or not i'm. it's the experience of going to the store try something on and someone telling me it looks good and enjoying the thrill of that experience. it's experience and entertainment. we have experts who literally tell you the story about the product. it's more than 360 of this mug. look i'm a woman who loves of shop just like you. here is my experience. but then the education side of it, think how many products online you could u
schools more competitive and at least one education watcher is hearing all of this and worrying about the costly fixes and wondering, if we are just compounding the problem. our guest is from the education action group much the longer you are in school the more you are inclined to remember what you learn, the smarter you get, the more competitive our kids get and on and on. >>guest: that seems good on its face but you have this notion that quantity is better than quality. what states need to look at is quality. the type of instructor, are they effective? ineffective? the trouble is, we have fought been able to determine that because we don't have a good evaluation system for teachers and unions are blocking that and protecting ineffective teachers. >> there is no guarantee that the districts that the effective teachers will teach more? >>guest: no, if you have ineffective teacher it doesn't matter how long your kid in there. what you need to focus is on teacher quality. what makes an effective teacher? that is what they should focus on. >>neil: leak you i travel a bit and around the w
they can continue to provide an education to these entitled, stupid, brats. anyway, you know who still hasn't been told about climate change? >> it is better he doesn't know. mr. bolton, uh par tied and fossil fuels, they are the same thing, right? >> yes. if they want to disinvest their endowment let them pay higher tuition or let their parents pay higher tuition. why stop there? if you don't like oil and gas companies why not the companies. divest from them too. and let's get to the center of the controversy. it is not just carbon-based fuels these people object to. they are carbon-based life forms. let's get to that next. >> and the life forms they disagree with are the ones they want to divest from. how will they go on spring break? when they are stoned out of their minds how are they going to get the pizza guy to get on his mow ped and come over and deliver the pizza without the use of fossil fuels. i never understand why they call them foss till fuels. i didn't know there were a lot of dead things underground, sandra, but then again i never went to school. you are a business person. g
ticket to go to education to make our kids smarter, today, sadly, they are only getting dumber. while we open our hearts let's t lose our minds. the folks deserve better to be locked out of a lockbox, and to be taken by greedy politicians who find other uses on the backs of that. not fair, not right. not remotely the thing to do. to staten islander john d'backo who knows of what i speak. he took matters in his own hand with his brother and buddies, made things right, here is john on the phone with the story. you quickly seize the initiative and did a lot more on just a local level. than fema. >> well, nei as you know my house wasffected my family was, but after stabilizing our situation we took a look around two days later, and we saw a bunch of federal response, out there with clip boards taking notes but we did not see boots on the ground helping people. yes my brother derrick and a few of hour close friends got out there, and started up a volunteer 100% grassroots effort, mobilized within a day or two over a hundred volunteers, and at this point we probably taken in and fed thousands
1 in 80 a member of the incidents cited by the cdc will realize win over educated and under or unemployed adults are brought into the welfare or this is not only an unnecessary but also critically unfair to a large group of people in our society. to prevent the scenario, changes must begin now. mercyhurst is dedicated to preparing ala graduates for productive careers. we have tried to develop partnerships and have with the verizon foundation, and other private donors. the next up for the aim program is to fund and launch the end ship program for seniors and provide -- internship program for seniors and provide programs that prepare them for the workplace. the program has been cited as a model program and has implemented a majority of the innovative components of the program with limited resources and opportunities beyond the commitment of university. is our hope is strong consideration is made for allocations of government resources to fund programs like the initiative at mercyhurst which assist students not only in achieving a college education, but help them to become prod
with one purpose in mind -- to educate citizens, community groups and policymakers about the positive impacts of choosing locally owned businesses. it is a network of locally owned independent businesses, community organizations and citizens that's grown to more than 3,000 local business owners. studies have shown that shifting just a small percentage of our shopping dollars to locally owned businesses could keep millions in our communities. this is something to think about as the holiday season approaches. instead of going to a chain, why not branch out and get your coffee at safari cafe on south port or get a hotdog at jean and june's and buy a few holiday gift at a local shop as well? local businesses help thriving communities. i'm glad to have local first chicago fighting for ours. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is rec
at the domestic cuts. educational programs including special education will be cut by $2.3 billion medicare payments to hospitals cut by $5.6 billion. prescription drug benefits lose $591 million. on the defense side, across the board 9.4% cut regardless of the program's merit. defense department operations and maintenance loses $3.9 billion in 2013. air force and navy aircraft purchases get cut by more than $4.2 billion. that is why some are calling cutting with a machete instead of a scalp pull. shep? >> shepard: stocks closed higher after a choppy day of trading. dow industrial average eked out 4 point gain over uncertainty about fiscal cliff thing. weakest spending report since may. a lot of storm out of that. according to the commerce department, spending dropped .2% last month. that's down a point or i sudden say 8% jump in september. analysts blame the super storm as i mentioned. its aftermath could cut economic growth for the rest of the year. syria is more isolated than ever tonight with the internet and phone lines down across the nation for the second straight day. government and
the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen next, that is an issue that the new syrian position should address. >> the rights of the minorities is an important issue. sometimes we emphasize the issues from their own perspective. when the syrian uprising started, christians, alliance, and christians being killed by participating. he decided to go back to his hometown. he is from damascus, but he is playing a role by training journalist to do the video to
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
. >> it is local control. >> thinking outside the box. don't we tell educator these have to be creative? >> this was creative, and the fact they had a choice is important. >> and they chose to hold hands. anthony, what do you think? they should have held hands -- if you look, they have their heads down. they are acting shameful and everybody is laughing. but why didn't they hold their hands up in a triumphant fist pump like in the olympics? >> you are right. >> own it. own that feeling. >> when i was in high school, i got caught smoking once. the gym teacher punched me like i slept with his wife. i mean, like a man he punched me. that was punishment back in what i call "the day." >> the way it should be. >> in high school i had a smoking area where kids could go out and smoke. joy what kind of hippie school did you go to? >> in massachusetts we had a smoking area. you weren't allowed? >> there was probably a drinking area too. >> it was only for cigarettes, but it was definitely where what they called the darrell lict -- derrilict kids would go. in grammar school we had a bench and if y
that the states get for that deregulation will go to education, health, and helping people with drug or a call problems. -- or alcohol problems. >> still to come, the duchess of cambridge is released from hospital, but now the couple has some serious decisions to make. the government of the philippines made an emotional appeal to four more to be done about climate change they after a deadly typhoon swept through the country this week, killing at least 300. from manila, here's the latest. >> a life -- alive against all the odds. carlos was inside his house when it was buried beneath a torrent of mud and water. >> we were hearing like the wind that night. we did not know where to run. the wind and rain brought by the typhoon were so strong i thought we would not survive. >> but for every purse and pulled from the rubble, there are many others still missing. all their relatives can do is can the list of names and wait. >> what else can i think of about what happened to my husband? i hope to see him alive, but if not, i just want to see him again. >> those who survive have lost everything. depende
. it is great for educational learning it has letters, numbers, colors but it also let's kids really rock out. >> it is a lot of fun. >> my kids loved it. >> second thing for kids a little older is the ipex piano. >> it combines high-tech with classic play of piano. you can play it without the ipad you can play the piano and with the ipad you can then play games that teach you how to read music and play your favorite songs. it is a great product. >> for kids ages 3-6. >> the leap pad 2 this is hot for kids a little older. >> tablets are huge. this is a tablet for the youngest kid. it let's kids be like mom and dad ages 3 and up. it has educational apps e books and has a camera on front and back. >> can you add just it for a 3-year-old or a 5-year-old? >> yes, the apps and educational content can be adjusted. you can download anew stuff all of the time. >> how much? >> $99. >> well worth it. >> this thing is a very popular company. we have this in our home. >> it is great. family love to travel for the holidays. it's a little tough on the younger ones ages 6-7. they can scoot along on their ow
in the "washington post" on the same subject. secondly, in the area of education i wouldn't be here today without good education and opportunity created by the national defense education act. i want to give belated thanks to the soviets for launching sputnik and scaring the hell out of the u.s. economist because as result of it they created a loan program that got me into college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bow
education, keep in mind, not everybody wants to stay here as attractive as our country is, some people want to learn here and go back to other countries thansd fine as well. but many will want to stay here. in losing some of those visas, again, we are only increasing the immigration problem, the legal immigration problem and moving in the opposite direction addressing immigration in this country. there is little to be proud of with regard to the current state of affairs in immigration. it's very different than when my grandparents came here and came to ellis island and albeit with a misspelled name were able to go to work the next day. it's becoming harder and harter. the absence of a legal way of immigrants that's in touch with our labor market in this country, the lack of having an ore rahtive immigration system, has led to 10 million people being here illegally, working here illegally, in many cases integrated into our communities, many of them have american children. yet without any way, currently, of getting right with the law. what we need to do in immigration reform is require that p
," welcome to cramerica. my job is not just to entertain you, but educate you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. we interrupt this broadcast to bring you actual news. with the averages hanging in there. dow, nasdaq climbing, you couldn't help but see some stocks are actually at last transcending the gravitational pull of washington, apple, google and amazon. just today gaining at the close of the market. look, i'm as aggravated as you are about the lack of progress over the fiscal cliff. is there progress? is there no progress? are the democrats giving? have the democrats given? the only thing given that i know is the tablet. that's what i want to spend a moment on while we bemoan the farce that is washington. one of the worst aspects of this era where we have to hang on every word of people who frankly aren't actually trying to make us any money, and if anything want to take it from us, is there are companies doing amazing things, so tonight in the interests of some companies that are doing great things that can make you money, i want to celebrate the products of three terrific companies as well a
the purpose of the group is much more education-driven. i think when you say that the funding for the group is going to buy handcuffs. i'm not necessarily convinced that is accurate. >> bill: that was a little gist. when you say educational. what education are we talking about here? >> sure. i mean, i think that a big part of any group like this is safety. and whether or not you agree with what they are doing. separate discussion all together. there is no questions that this sort of behavior is happening. it's happening on college campuses. >> bill: you want people to be safe. you want people to know not to hurt themselves. hurt the university with student funding. i have got to be honest, mr. samuels, the only bondage i experienced at harvard was paying tuition. all right? that was bon dang. why should the university get involved with this, you know, marginal group that hobby. why should we fund it? >> a big part of what harvard does and you look at the office of student life and the organizations that they are funding. they try to find whether they do this successfully again is is a diffe
want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themselves into. is obama has been very clever here, the president. i think what he's done is skillfully said to the public, if he goes over the fiscal cliff, the republicans are prepared to make the entire middle class to pay more tax to save 2% of the wealthiest americans paying a little bit more. and that's a very bad position for t
achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> you have probably heard about ptsd. you probably feel like you have a fairly good grasp on what it is or at least the parameters of it. here's something we really don't know about ptsd, how to treat it, or at least how to treat it right. how really to get to the bottom of this horrible disorder that 7 million americans are suffering through. and then along co
forward and what this university was all about, which was a great chance to get a fantastic education and play good football, and so we weren't here then, so we knew that this was a chance for us as a new football coaching staff to help these kids and help this athletic department and this university move forward. >> to put it in perspective, let's remind people of the sanctions that were laid down after the scandal. a $60 million fine, a four-year bowl ban, all wins vacated, scholarships cut for four years. on the back of that, 15 players left, 31 fourth and fifth year seniors stayed. how did you persuade the ones who stayed to stay? because clearly, it wasn't going to be to their footballing advantage necessarily. >> right. you know, it was in the summertime when the sanctions came out and right away, we had a team meeting that day, and we talked about a lot of different things but we talked about the commitment that they had made to each other and the commitment that they had made to the football program and to the university. and that there was still the education here and the abi
't been actually in-elected office for a while, but he's making education reform and viewers know what i think about that. he certainly is an interesting character. i keep thinking, won't the bush last name be a liability in this case? >> maybe. but you know what, i have to say, i also -- i don't agree with all of his policies, but i have to give him a lot of credit. for two years, he's been telling the republican party they have to be more moderate and tone it down in immigration and recalibrate and nobody listened to him. he was like the lone wolf out there. i also give him credit -- i don't agree with the policies, but he's been talking a lot about education in his reforms. he likes one of his pet topics is income and equality. you don't hear republicans talking about that. those are the things that will resonate with independent voters. actually, i did see a poll recently in miami herald that showed that jeb bush was more popular among hispanics. jeb bush was more popular than rubio. it goes to your point. if you have a great message and someone who connects with the electorate. it d
the quality of life, education and continued development of those affected by what is a spectrum disorders and we must continue -- affected by autism spectrum disorders and we must continue to support them. there are many experts, individuals and groups who can help us in this effort. i want to take this moment to thank all of you for being here. as the chairman said, there are so many people interested in this issue, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for t
. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back. take a look at netflix. the stock catching fire today after getting a deal for exclusive streaming rights to disney movies. the deal does not kick in until after 2016, but investors are loving it today. how much of a game changer is it for netflix? porter, your take on this. is this justified, this move in the stock? >> reid hastings, netflix ceo, is pulling himself back from the brink with this move, maria. it's absolutely a show stopper. >> okay. so why is it so important for netflix? >> well, they've pretty much exhausted the growth potential in the u.s. their growth is coming from other countries. right now they're operating, believe it or not, in 51 countries outside the u.s. they have about 30 million paying subscribers. they don't have enough content. the content that they've just acquired the rights to through disney is a real show stopper. it puts them miles ahead of the competition. a
worse. there's no change with education, with infrastructure or health care. corruption, poverty and hunger haven't decreased. >> lehrer: head of the u.n.'s large haiti mission here acknowledges the slow pace but says there has been some progress on the massive rebuilding task, a much smaller number of tent dwellings since last year, for example. >> if haiti were a glass and it's gone from being 10% full to 15% full, let's recognize that without in anyway diminishing the fact that you've still got 85% of the glass full. >> reporter: but fisher says many of the problems were endemic to haiti long before the earthquake. >> what we've seen is people who are in camps because of entrenched poverty. many of these people were hidden before in slums. they're now in the open in camp. that is a function of underdevelopment? it's a function of weak governance. it's a function of lack of alternative. >> reporter: he says one of the biggest problems is that haiti's government crippled by the quake in a corrupt reputation hasn't been able to lay out national priorities for the rebuilding. that
. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. [laughter] americans are compassionate people. there is a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. those obligations are beyond dispute. the real debate is how best we can meet them. it is whether they are better met by private groups or government, voluntary action or government action. the truth is, there has to be a balance between the two. government must ask for the common good while leaving private groups free to do the work only they can do. there is a vast middle ground between the government and the individual. our families and our neighborhoods. the groups we joined and the places of worship. t
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